Peek at Shot

revealReverseThought it would be fun to see the composite I’m working on now, so I shot it on my phone in this video.

  • The top is the original footage. It couldn’t be used as is; too gentrified looking to be a forgotten, mysterious wood.
  • The little inset is the roto of Miranda I’m working on.
  • The bottom shot is the rough composite. It uses a scratch roto I made of Miranda, so I could see how she’d interact in the wood.

You can see the roto is well on its way, and that the “wood” is built. After the elements are combined and the composite refined, the shot will be complete. Then just one major shot’s left, plus several small ones.

“Reveal” Shot Finished!

The huge visual effects shot I started working on on Aug. 14 2011 is finally finished. That was the main one–the climactic reveal of the meaning of the film; and it presented so many challenges. There are close to 100 versions of it that existed. Now, there really isn’t too much left to do on “Wood.”

Feathers

 

feathers

Working in Apple Motion trying to generate CG feathers that mimic those in the live-action shots (real feathers). I’ll composite them into live action shots that need them (continuity). It’s the movement behavior that’s difficult to match; the direction of the wind in the live shots. Pictured is a screenshot of a shot element I’m working on now.

Motion Tracking

Got a clean motion track of the original footage of “Emerge” shot today. The bottom picture shows original footage with camera motion being tracked. You can see all the individual frames as red dots below (x, y, correlation points). 

Wasn’t easy, because not much of the shot was trackable. A distinctive trunk or branch would only stay in frame (or not be covered up by Miranda) for a dozen frames or so. Directly below is the background plate that the motion will be linked to.ImageImage

Progress

Image

I’m energized today by the results of some experimentation. This shot had me worried for a long time, because the hair detail at the edges of Miranda’s head and shoulders needed to be cleanly isolated for a convincing composite, and I didn’t know if I could do it.

Normally, if you wanted to place a live action figure into a composite, you’d shoot against a green or blue screen. But this sequence changed significantly since production time, and I have to make do with what was shot.

You can see that Miranda’s hair is similar in hue to the background (right). This makes it difficult to select it. After experimenting with Shake’s luma and chroma key nodes,  I found its color-replace node, along with the threshold node, gave me the results above (left). If you look closely at the hair edges, you can see that I was able to retain decent hair detail, with the background quite cleanly removed.

I’ll try to use this as a matte for the hair detail, and combine it with a rotoscope of Miranda’s face and body to get a solid and clean Miranda to place into a wood composite.